California voted unanimously – ebikes with speeds up to 45km/h treated like bicycles

Congresul statului California a votat în unanimitate legea Chiu: bicicletele electrice cu viteze de până la 45km/h vor fi tratate ca și biciclete clasice, nu ca mopede. Vor putea circula pe piste de biciclete și pe șosele fără permis de conducere, fără număr de înmatriculare și fără asigurari obligatorii!

On 7 oct 2015, California Gov. Jerry Brown  signed  into law a bill that modernizes e-bike regulations and ensures that they are treated like traditional bicycles instead of mopeds. The law passed both houses of the California legislature unanimously.

The law, which becomes effective Jan. 1, creates three classes of e-bikes. Class 1 consists of pedal-assist bikes and Class 2 of bikes with throttles. Both are limited to motor-assisted speeds of 20 miles an hour. Class 3 consists of “speed pedelecs,” or pedal-assist bikes that can reach assisted speeds of up to 28 miles an hour.

The California law is the first significant victory for an industry lobbying effort that was launched early this year by the e-bike committee of the Bicycle Product Suppliers Association, and soon joined by PeopleForBikes and the California Bicycle Coalition, or CalBike. The BPSA and PFB hope to mount similar lobbying efforts in other states next year. California is a key state because it is a large market for e-bikes and is home to most of the leading U.S. e-bike brands.

By boosting access to e-bikes, supporters believe the measure will help grow cycling by opening up the market to consumers who may be unable or unwilling to ride conventional bicycles. “Bicycling is great for our state’s economy, for our residents’ health, and for our communities’ prosperity,” said Dave Snyder, executive director of CalBike. “E-bikes make bicycling more accessible to Californians so they’re an important part of that solution.”

“We believe that these new regulations will serve as a model for many other states to follow and provide safe and appropriate access to bicycling infrastructure for the wide variety of low-speed electric bicycles that are being marketed today,” said Larry Pizzi, chair of the BPSA’s e-bike committee. Pizzi is also senior vice president for sales and marketing for Accell North America, the U.S. division of Europe’s biggest e-bike manufacturer.

Class 1 and 2 bikes will be allowed to go wherever regular bikes are permitted. Class 3 bikes are restricted to roadways and bike paths, trails and bikeways that are adjacent to roadways. Helmets for Class 3 bikes are mandatory, and riders have to be at least 16 years old. Unlike moped riders, however, no one riding an e-bike that falls into one of the three classifications will be required to have a driver’s license or license plate.

The following is an excerpt from the bill:
(a) An “electric bicycle” is a bicycle equipped with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts.

(1) A “class 1 electric bicycle,” or “low-speed pedal-assisted electric bicycle,” is a bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.

(2) A “class 2 electric bicycle,” or “low-speed throttle-assisted electric bicycle,” is a bicycle equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.

(3) A “class 3 electric bicycle,” or “speed pedal-assisted electric bicycle,” is a bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour, and equipped with a speedometer.
For Class 3, the rider must wear a helmet and be at least 16 years old.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s